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COMMUNIQUÉ DE PRESSE: Les Algonquins voient dans la décision Tsilhquot’in la confirmation du titre foncier de la Première Nation sur les territoires des ententes de gestion territoriale conclues avec le Canada et le Québec

by Algonquins of Barriere Lake


(Kitiganik, Algonquin Territory / July 28, 2014) On 26 June 2014, the Supreme Court of Canada made the Tsilhqot'in decision that recognizes the land title of the Tsilhqot'in Nation on a large part of its traditional territory. In this decision, the highest court in the country has also established a framework for the titling of First Nations in Canada. 
 
The old traditional chief of Barriere Lake, Jean Maurice Matchewan said "I negotiated and signed the trilateral agreement in 1991 on behalf of our community to ensure that our traditional territory, on which we have lived thousands of years is sustainably managed according to the principles of conservation of natural resources and protect our way of life. We were and are still in disagreement with the present policy of comprehensive land claims in Canada that would require the abolition of our title and our Aboriginal rights. The trilateral agreement was an alternative to unfair Canadian land claims policy. We now know that our community meets the legal criteria for the decision to prove Tsilhqot'in Aboriginal title and land management agreements that we have signed with Canada and Quebec in 1991 and 1998 as well as studies carried out under these agreements, are now part of the proof of our title and rights of our First Nation in the territory of the trilateral agreement. "
 
The Chief Casey Ratt Algonquins of Barriere Lake said, "The cause Tsilhqot'in confirms that the decision of our community agreements territorial management with Canada and Quebec was part of their duty to consult and accommodate our community regarding Aboriginal rights and title. We fully expect that Canada and Quebec preserve the "honor of the Crown" that we hear about but that we never see and that governments honor the spirit and letter of the agreements in 1991 and 1998 negotiating an agreement with our community to implement the joint recommendations of former Quebec ministers, John Ciaccia and Clifford Lincoln. "
 
Mr. Clifford Lincoln, Special Representative and negotiator for the Algonquins of Barriere Lake concluded by saying "it's been over eight years since Mr. Ciaccia and I presented our joint recommendations to the Cabinet of Quebec and I attribute much of unrest in the community about the leadership, delays in the negotiation of an agreement on the implementation of our recommendations. Quebec has continued to allow logging in the territory of the trilateral agreement and other development activities that have a negative impact on the Algonquins of Barriere Lake and their lifestyle. However, Algonquin derive no profit and they are not involved in decisions concerning the management of resources, as required by the agreements signed with the federal and Quebec governments. Following the Tsilhqot'in decision, the Quebec government must react quickly to give a concrete sign of his intention to negotiate an agreement for the implementation of joint recommendations that Mr. Ciaccia and I handed it no more eight years. "
 
Last year, the Quebec Minister of Natural Resources - without real consultation of the Algonquins of Barriere Lake - issued cutting permits for the exploitation 2013-14 campaign to Resolute Forest Products and other large companies to logging which were then conducted extensive clearcutting during the summer and fall until that Algonquins stop unauthorized cut that was in violation of agreements signed with the First Nation in 1991 and 1998 agreements. 
 
Resolute Forest Products and other logging companies have seriously damaged many sensitive areas on the territory of the trilateral agreement Barriere Lake, including sensitive sites the Quebec Ministry of Natural Resources and forestry companies knew the particular cultural and ecological importance.
 
The Algonquins have redefined with Quebec steps a harmonized process for identification and protection of cultural and ecological sites. The Quebec government is now committed to resume negotiations with the Algonquins of Barriere Lake to implement recommendations of the seven Lincoln-Ciaccia report. The Algonquins of Barriere Lake intend to ensure that these negotiations start without delay after the elections on August 9, 2014. 
 
-30 -
 
For further information, please contact: 
 
Chief Casey Ratt Cell: (819) 441-8002
Norman Matchewan Advisor Cell: (819) 441-8006
Tony Wawatie spokesman Cell: (819) 355-3662
Michel Thusky, French spokesperson Phone: (819) 435-2171
 
 
For BRIEFING PAPER TRILATERAL AGREEMENTS, 1991 AND BILATERAL 1998  http://bit.ly/1thCKhg
 
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Barriere Lake Solidarity (Barriere Lake Solidarity)
Montreal
Member since December 2013

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Barriere Lake Solidarity is a collective of supporters of the Mitchikanibikok Inik, The Algonquins of Barriere Lake in their struggles for land and self-determination.

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same post ?

Could you published the call-out in french and in english in the same post ?

thanks

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